Protected by Copyscape

Translate

Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Inferno by Dan Brown

Hey everyone! I finished reading Dan Brown's "Inferno" a few days ago. It was my first "Big Book" of the Summer. If you are unsure about The Big Book Challenge, you can read my blog post here, or check out Bookbybook's description.

Publication Date: May 14th 2013
Genre: Thriller, Science-Fiction
My Goodreads Rating: 4/5
Source: Own Copy

If you hadn't guessed already, Dan Brown's Inferno revolves around Dante's Inferno. The story is about a Harvard Professor and a young doctor as they run from governments for reasons unknown to them.   The story is a blend between science fiction, action and adventure. Merged with countless tales of European History, Inferno truly is an exciting read.
 The book begins in a hospital, and continues through monumental settings. As the characters are introduced to the reader, audiences have a lot of time to speculate about the cause for hospitalization and the events that follow. Nothing is known to the reader, nor to the characters.




  Most of the characters in this story are dynamic, and though the story is told in third person, the chapters tell the story of various characters at once. I enjoyed this refreshing take on third person story-telling. Flitting between characters can be taxing for the reader, but Brown writes in a way that automatically alerts the reader on the character they're reading about.
 The characters are plucked into a situation of life or death. They are unaware of what is happening around them, so they choose to confide in one-another. Through the book, Dr. Sienna Brooks and Professor Robert Langdon work their way through history to save the future of their world
 There are various themes that are discussed through the book. The main one being population control and the deterioration of the Earth. Other themes, such as Renaissance, Catholic History, Trust and Team-Work are brought to light as the story progresses.
 Brown makes use of various phrases and verses from Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy (Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso) and awakens the readers to a world of faith and religion. Readers see characters well-immersed with the text as they use cantos (like chapters) to solve small mysteries in relation to the story.
 Although I won't say much in this description (for fear of spoiling the book for you), I will say this. If you are in need of a fast-paced adventure that requires your attention, Inferno is the book for you!

1 comment:

  1. It sounds great! I read DaVinci Code but still need to read this one. Thanks for the review and for participating in the Big Book Summer Challenge!

    Sue

    2016 Big Book Summer Challenge

    ReplyDelete

Hey guys! Thanks for stopping by! I'd love to hear your thoughts and suggestions, so be sure to leave a comment!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Blog search directory